Tag Archives: World Cancer Day

22 Proactive Things You Can Do on World Cancer Day and Beyond

By Hui Xie-Zukauskas

Mid_Blue Globe Bkg. Red Ribbon for WCDFebruary 4th each year is designated as World Cancer Day. This day is significant because it

  • kicks off a drive to expand awareness of cancer and its prevention;
  • offers a chance to discover risk factors for cancer and take protective measures;
  • provides a time to reflect on what you can do to make a difference in the fight against cancer;
  • embraces people around the globe to fulfill whatever needs to be done to control this deadly disease; and
  • presents an opportunity to spread a message – We Can Save Millions of People from Preventable Deaths Each Year!

Lifestyle-centered cancer prevention is evidence-based and it’s science. It’s no longer a theory or hypothesis, or breaking news. Healthy lifestyle measures provide powerful ways to lower the risk for many types of cancer.

The theme of World Cancer Day for the current three years (2016-2018) is “We Can. I Can.” Surely, each of us can do something, no matter how small. So, I have compiled a list of actions you can take for World Cancer Day and every day after:

  1. Set a “Cancer Patients First” agenda: Whether from a note, gift, prayer, or—best of all—a visit, let your friend battling cancer know you are with him or her in this fight.
  2. Pack a tool kit for cancer awareness or a thoughtful kit for cancer care.
  3. Remind your loved one to get a cancer screening. Early detection saves lives.
  4. Change one unhealthy behavior, e.g., harmful sun exposure, intentional tanning, alcohol abuse, or tobacco smoking (smokeless tobacco causes cancer too). Importantly, stay on the right course.
  5. Do something about early childhood weight management, especially control obesity in childhood cancer survivors.  Unhealthy behaviors and overweight that develop early in life and persist over time can increase not only the risk for some types of cancer but also cancer-related mortality.
  6. Host a Veggies/Vegetarian party or gathering (the size doesn’t matter).  Alternatively, go on a Mediterranean diet. The point is to replace Western diet components, which are rich in refined grains, animal fats, excessive sugar, and processed meat but poor in fruits, vegetables, legumes, and whole wheat or whole grains. A substantial body of evidence has linked the Mediterranean diet to increased cardiovascular benefits and prevention of some chronic diseases.
  7. Make a “Cancer Prevention” family dinner, or make a “Cancer Prevention Salad.”  Family meals can be a cost-effective intervention for weight management. Evidence suggests that regular family meals protect against unhealthy eating and obesity in children. If time or schedule is challenging, get your teens and/or other family members involved.
  8. Start or improve your weight management plan and actions. Make sure to have a balanced diet and exercise regime.
  9. Enjoy an “Exercise Day” or “Move Day,” and at least, consider taking a 30-minute walk.
  10. Take a “NO JUNK FOOD Day,” and limit red meats. Then do it often.
  11. Drink filtered tap water at home. Drink plenty of filtered water away from home too.
  12. Drink tea to replace sugar-rich beverages.
  13. Better: Have a “Triple Combat” day, by combining three intensive but joyful actions together.
  14. Give your unexplained pain some TLC by paying attention to it, tracking its duration, frequency or pattern, and scheduling a visit to your doctor.
  15. Give cancer caregivers a token of love to honor their labor of love.
  16. Write or speak to your local/national legislator or lawmaker about a policy idea to make food systems safer or make the environment safer.
  17. Speak out or stand up against any external source that potentially promotes cancer.
  18. Volunteer for a cancer fundraising or a cancer care center.
  19. Support the great cause of fighting cancer in any form you can.
  20. Parents and teachers: Advise your girls and boys to vaccinate against HPV. Recommended vaccination starts at age 11 or 12.
  21. Go along with proven strategies to prevent cardiovascular disease (CVD). Why?  Because doing whatever is practical or plausible to lower your risk of CVD will enhance your potential to reduce the risk of cancer. For instance, research findings indicate that proven preventive measures for CVD are identical to preventive actions for prostate cancer.
  22. Take pancreatic cancer seriously. Based on the proposed “pancreatic injury−inflammation−cancer” pathway, it’s critical to avoid risk factors such as smoking, chronic pancreatitis, diabetes, and obesity.   Pancreatic cancer remains a complex, lethal malignancy with the worst prognosis, and a lack of early diagnostic symptoms. It’s also resistant to conventional chemo- and radiation therapies. The rate of its incidence is slowly increasing.

The list can go on and on…

By now, you likely see a clearly centered theme—prevention, which is the most cost-effective implement to fight cancer.

Remember: Cancer doesn’t develop overnight. It’s vitally essential to stick to a healthy lifestyle. Take protective measures such as enjoying a balanced diet, regular physical activity, and a healthy weight now and far beyond World Cancer Day.

And yes, every single small step counts! It’s a life-course approach.

 

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Inspired by World Cancer Day

By Hui Xie-Zukauskas

WCD_WeCan n ICanWorld Cancer Day (February 4th, each year) is a global observance and initiative to fight cancer. The theme of 2016 World Cancer Day is “We can” and “I can”, being selected by the Union for International Cancer Control (UICC).

We can and I can – clarity, simplicity and forcefulness.

Much focus of World Cancer Day goes towards raising awareness of cancer, reducing risks of cancer, and learning how to prevent, detect and treat cancer early. To help achieve this goal, I’d like to bring one thing to the spotlight: Lifestyle modification.

Why? Only 5–10% of all cancer cases are attributed to genetic or inherited mutation. 35- 40% of cancer can be prevented by a major lifestyle change.

Next, how can you modify lifestyle to a healthier, livelier one? I’ve given a lot of information and strategies through CancerPreventionDaily.com. Here are 7 quick and effective tips:

1.      Quit smoking, period. This is not only for the individual but also for your loved ones and many, many others.

2.      Avoid or limit alcohol. Have we seen enough how alcohol takes a toll at physical, mental, emotional and social levels?

3.      Get physically active! Walk, run, jump, play or gardening … do whatever you can at where you are to move each day.

4.      Eat smart. Diet is intimately linked to diseases, as English Proverb cautions, “Don’t dig your grave with your own knife and fork”. In developing cancer, processed meats and foods speed it up, while a plenty of fresh vegetables and fruits slow it down.

5.      Maintain a healthy weight. It is well-accepted that obesity is a significant risk factor of several types of cancer. Taking the above actions will benefit weight loss.

6.      Avoid over-exposure to sun.

7.      Remember early detection.

Cancer is preventable disease. With hope and love, we all can do our own part and contribute to prevention or cure of cancer, ultimately making a difference in saving lives.

 

Image credit: worldcancerday.org

A Message from World Cancer Day 2015

By Hui Xie-Zukauskas

Does the word “cancer” scare you? Sure, it scares almost all of us.

Then the question is – Are you determined to do something every day to stay away from that “big C”?

environment-concept-1024966-mThis year’s World Cancer Day has focused on the fight against cancer with a positive and proactive approach to patient treatment and care. It also stresses that meeting challenge of prevention is not beyond our control. One of important approaches outlined is to promote an enabling environment for healthy living in our communities. Let me expand it a little more.

Raising awareness of healthy environment at home, work and communities at large is paramount. Harmful chemicals post a serious, sometimes lethal, threat to public health. Among them, some are known carcinogens to humans, others are tumor enhancers that are originated from the use of tobacco, alcohol and effects of food components as factors to promote cancers. Needless to say, many of them contribute to chronic illnesses such as heart problems, obesity and Alzheimer’s disease.

Keep in mind, these carcinogens and toxins are hidden, heavily-loaded, and unpleasantly surprised to many folks. Just take a quick tour around your home, you’ll have an inventory on the spot.

-   Household products from cleaners, drain openers, air fresheners to paints and art supplies

-   Personal care products such as body wash, shampoo, toothpaste, deodorants, and cosmetics

-   Food (fruits, vegetables, poultry, meat and fish) containing toxic pesticides, herbicides and preservatives

There could be more…

Toxic environmental agents play a role in developing cancers and devastating millions of lives. In addition, the negative consequence could have an impact on our next generations. Without doubt, public health perspective is logical and scientific. However, there are obstacles such as convenience, economic or profit interests, and sometimes politics.

Preventable exposure to toxins is a key to fighting cancer. That’s why we should do our parts to remove those “scaring carcinogens or toxins” from our food, water, and air. We should take small steps every day to avoid or minimize any harmful exposure, whenever and wherever possible. Eventually, we can reduce the risk of cancers that are preventable and are associated with hazardous environmental chemicals.

Let “Green” environment beautify the world!

 

Image credit: by spekulator