Category Archives: Cancer Risk Factors

22 Proactive Things You Can Do on World Cancer Day and Beyond

By Hui Xie-Zukauskas

Mid_Blue Globe Bkg. Red Ribbon for WCDFebruary 4th each year is designated as World Cancer Day. This day is significant because it

  • kicks off a drive to expand awareness of cancer and its prevention;
  • offers a chance to discover risk factors for cancer and take protective measures;
  • provides a time to reflect on what you can do to make a difference in the fight against cancer;
  • embraces people around the globe to fulfill whatever needs to be done to control this deadly disease; and
  • presents an opportunity to spread a message – We Can Save Millions of People from Preventable Deaths Each Year!

Lifestyle-centered cancer prevention is evidence-based and it’s science. It’s no longer a theory or hypothesis, or breaking news. Healthy lifestyle measures provide powerful ways to lower the risk for many types of cancer.

The theme of World Cancer Day for the current three years (2016-2018) is “We Can. I Can.” Surely, each of us can do something, no matter how small. So, I have compiled a list of actions you can take for World Cancer Day and every day after:

  1. Set a “Cancer Patients First” agenda: Whether from a note, gift, prayer, or—best of all—a visit, let your friend battling cancer know you are with him or her in this fight.
  2. Pack a tool kit for cancer awareness or a thoughtful kit for cancer care.
  3. Remind your loved one to get a cancer screening. Early detection saves lives.
  4. Change one unhealthy behavior, e.g., harmful sun exposure, intentional tanning, alcohol abuse, or tobacco smoking (smokeless tobacco causes cancer too). Importantly, stay on the right course.
  5. Do something about early childhood weight management, especially control obesity in childhood cancer survivors.  Unhealthy behaviors and overweight that develop early in life and persist over time can increase not only the risk for some types of cancer but also cancer-related mortality.
  6. Host a Veggies/Vegetarian party or gathering (the size doesn’t matter).  Alternatively, go on a Mediterranean diet. The point is to replace Western diet components, which are rich in refined grains, animal fats, excessive sugar, and processed meat but poor in fruits, vegetables, legumes, and whole wheat or whole grains. A substantial body of evidence has linked the Mediterranean diet to increased cardiovascular benefits and prevention of some chronic diseases.
  7. Make a “Cancer Prevention” family dinner, or make a “Cancer Prevention Salad.”  Family meals can be a cost-effective intervention for weight management. Evidence suggests that regular family meals protect against unhealthy eating and obesity in children. If time or schedule is challenging, get your teens and/or other family members involved.
  8. Start or improve your weight management plan and actions. Make sure to have a balanced diet and exercise regime.
  9. Enjoy an “Exercise Day” or “Move Day,” and at least, consider taking a 30-minute walk.
  10. Take a “NO JUNK FOOD Day,” and limit red meats. Then do it often.
  11. Drink filtered tap water at home. Drink plenty of filtered water away from home too.
  12. Drink tea to replace sugar-rich beverages.
  13. Better: Have a “Triple Combat” day, by combining three intensive but joyful actions together.
  14. Give your unexplained pain some TLC by paying attention to it, tracking its duration, frequency or pattern, and scheduling a visit to your doctor.
  15. Give cancer caregivers a token of love to honor their labor of love.
  16. Write or speak to your local/national legislator or lawmaker about a policy idea to make food systems safer or make the environment safer.
  17. Speak out or stand up against any external source that potentially promotes cancer.
  18. Volunteer for a cancer fundraising or a cancer care center.
  19. Support the great cause of fighting cancer in any form you can.
  20. Parents and teachers: Advise your girls and boys to vaccinate against HPV. Recommended vaccination starts at age 11 or 12.
  21. Go along with proven strategies to prevent cardiovascular disease (CVD). Why?  Because doing whatever is practical or plausible to lower your risk of CVD will enhance your potential to reduce the risk of cancer. For instance, research findings indicate that proven preventive measures for CVD are identical to preventive actions for prostate cancer.
  22. Take pancreatic cancer seriously. Based on the proposed “pancreatic injury−inflammation−cancer” pathway, it’s critical to avoid risk factors such as smoking, chronic pancreatitis, diabetes, and obesity.   Pancreatic cancer remains a complex, lethal malignancy with the worst prognosis, and a lack of early diagnostic symptoms. It’s also resistant to conventional chemo- and radiation therapies. The rate of its incidence is slowly increasing.

The list can go on and on…

By now, you likely see a clearly centered theme—prevention, which is the most cost-effective implement to fight cancer.

Remember: Cancer doesn’t develop overnight. It’s vitally essential to stick to a healthy lifestyle. Take protective measures such as enjoying a balanced diet, regular physical activity, and a healthy weight now and far beyond World Cancer Day.

And yes, every single small step counts! It’s a life-course approach.

 

Image credit: Designer at <a href=”http://www.freepik.com/free-photos-vectors/medical”>Medical vector designed by Ibrandify – Freepik.com</a>

How Can Climate Change Impact Cancer Risk

By Hui Xie-Zukauskas

Climate change & Cancer_CPD comboMuch of the talk lately is about a heat wave. “Are you cooked?” “Are you baked?”

Yes, massive, harsh and dangerous heat waves that hit most regions of the country are certainly unwelcomed, and unexpected in its increasing intensity, frequency and duration. Sure, mother nature is something to blame, but climate change and consequential global warming cannot be ignored. Particularly, I’m going to weigh in an issue seemingly less visible yet closely related.

Global warming is no longer a theory or myth, rather a reality. Just look around – those extreme weather cases, more wildfires, more rainfalls and floods, especially the worst, deadly flooding in West Virginia in 1,000 years. A warming planet undoubtedly plays a role.

As an alarming and disturbing note, climate change posts the biggest threat to public health in the 21st century (Castello et al., Lancet 2009). Solid science has told us so. Now, a more specific question should be addressed – Is there a connection between climate change and cancer development? If so, how? My focus here is to explain how climate change affects a risk for cancer, directly and indirectly, in FIVE ways.

  1. Increased our exposure to toxic chemicals by heavy and long-lasting rainfalls or floods: Global warming followed by excessive rainfalls wash toxic chemicals into water and surrounding communities. Then what? Think about smoking. A cigarette releases plentiful chemicals (>7000); out of them about 70 are carcinogens (i.e. cancer-causing substances). These harmful agents damage almost every organ in the body by causing genetic or DNA mutation, leading to the development of cancer.
  2. More intensified exposure to toxins by higher temperature: Heat itself can make toxic chemicals either more poisonous or unstable with unpredictable fallouts.
  3. More bacterial growth driven by a warmer or higher temperature: Bacteria have been attributing to cancer through inducing chronic inflammation and generating bacterial metabolites as carcinogenic end-products.
  4. Increased diffusion of UV radiation by depleting stratospheric ozone (i.e. “good ozone”): As you know, the overexposure to UV radiation causes skin cancer. Noticeably, UV radiation also suppresses some aspects of immunity, as a result, weakening your defense against cancer.
  5. Reduced air quality we breathe by producing ground-level ozone (i.e. “bad ozone”): Increasing evidence suggests considerable or long-term exposure to air pollutants may lead to lung diseases, such as lung cancer and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), though it’s not conclusive.

In addition, chronic exposure to air pollutants associated with global warming causes an increase in oxidative stress and inflammation that contribute to cancer. Research findings also reveal that sensitive individuals and vulnerable populations such as children and the elderly are more susceptible to air pollution related illness because of potential genetic predisposition.

So, collectively, climate change can impact cancer risk, cancer development, and for sure, cancer care. Any misconception of global warming is relatively naïve and potentially dangerous.

Climate change is largely man-made, which is beyond the scope of this article. However, it is clear that we must take responsibility to safeguard a healthy environment, because a healthy environment supports healthy living for each and every one of us.

 

Image credits: www.freeimages.com/; www.medicinenet.com/

Skin Cancer and Aging: Causes and Solutions

By Hui Xie-Zukauskas

UV radition n Ozone layerHere comes the sun! And we all enjoy it. You may be heading for sunny beaches soon. I’d like to remind you of damage from the sun overexposure. By providing some key insights into harmful effects of the sun, and reflecting on skin aging, I am diving a little deeper into this subject, and will equip you with a sun protection tool kit – 5 Essentials or “SHADE”.

Numbers and Notions

First, do you know that more people suffered from skin cancer than all other cancers combined over the past three decades? Breaking down the statistics, it reveals approximately 40-50% of Americans who live to age 60+ will have one type of common skin cancers, and more than 90% of skin cancer is caused by excessive or unnecessary exposure to the sun?

Types of skin aging

If the above numbers cannot transmit the roles of aging and sun hazard in skin cancer, let me briefly elaborate what happened to our skin over our lifetime. As we age, our skin – the largest organ in the human body – goes through the same escalating loss of structure and function as other organs. But unlike other organs, the skin is openly exposed to environmental pollutants and lifestyle-related hazards (e.g. excessive sun, tanning, smoking, etc.). ALL is cumulative! Mostly concerning, ultraviolet (UV) radiation from sunlight causes so called “photoaging”.

I summarize here how photoaging differs from natural skin aging, to help you understand how biological evolution of the skin and adverse effects of the sun are interplayed.

Natural / Intrinsic Aging Photo- / Extrinsic Aging
Cumulative process Yes Yes
Common locations face, neck, forearm, and lower leg Yes
Cause Aging-related Sun damage overlaying natural aging
Visible characteristics Looseness, sagginess, fine wrinkles, dryness Increased pigmentation, deep wrinkles, harsh or rough skin
Structural alterations Epidermal − dermal area thinning and weakening, reduced elasticity, delay in wound healing Severe damage of dermal and connective tissues, promoting age-related skin diseases and skin cancer

Fundamental nature of Sun Damage

UV radiation is a known human carcinogen (i.e. cancer-causing agent). Let me expand further on UV radiation as a major causal factor of skin cancer and premature skin aging at cellular and molecular levels.

  1. UV radiation can modify DNA, intensify oxidative stress, and alter cellular antioxidant and immune defense, as well as other cellular structural or signal transduction pathways.
  2. UV-induced immune suppression contributes considerably to skin malignancies.
  3. UVB can directly cause specific DNA damage, when left unrepaired, it leads to mutations, consequently predisposing individuals to any cancer.

Importantly, bear in mind that UV exposure in children under age 10 has been linked to an increased risk of developing melanoma (malignant) and non-melanoma skin cancer later in life. Thus, childhood is a susceptible window for long-term dangerous effects of sun damage.

Sun safety with 5 Essentials – SHADE

Fortunately, skin cancer is one of the most preventable types of cancer. So, how can you protect yourself and your family? Employ this tool kit, i.e. the acronym “SHADE”.

S stands for “Sunscreen application”

A wide variety of sunscreens are available on the market but not all products are created equal. Make sure to use sunscreens that block both UVA and UVB. In addition, use a moisturizer with SPF 15 or higher on a daily basis.

H stands for “Hide away from the sun”.

Whether you stroll under the sun or enjoy outdoor adventures, wear sunglasses, a hat, and cover up with loose clothing. Also, make sure your sunglasses have both UVA and UVB blocking properties. 

A stands for “Avoid the sun during its most intensive time”

Staying away from the sun is especially paramount between the hours of 11 a.m. and 3 p.m., because during this window of time, the sun is at its strongest, thereby making this time the riskiest for sun damage.

D stands for “Detect early and Defense daily”.

Skin cancer can occur just about anywhere on the skin, but most often on the areas exposed to the sun, of course, also in odd places. With that in mind, look out vigilantly for moles, bumps or spots, by following the “ABCDE” guidance from WebMD, and noticing pain or fluid as a red flag too, for early detection. Schedule an annual skin cancer screening if you are among those “high risk” individuals.

In addition, antioxidants are powerful weapons to fight or “catch” free radicals generated from UV. Hence, build up your antioxidant defense by eating plenty of fresh, colorful fruits and vegetables, and more salmon.

E stands for “Educate everyone”.

To emphasize, E is for educating, not entertaining under the sun! Start with children and young adults. Regardless of gender and age, we are all exposed to the same sun. Today, the sun is getting less merciful compared to three or more decades ago due to thinning of ozone protection.

Take home message: 

Keep a balance between sun pleasure and sun damage, and hold the value of proper skin care. At the end, healthy skin in the course of life may promote better mental and emotional health. And remember “SHADE”.

 

Reference (on the table): Quan & Fisher. Gerontology. 2015; 61:427-34.

Image credit: thezonehole.com

Links between Obesity, Diabetes, and Colon Cancer

By Hui Xie-Zukauskas

Links 3 conditions_CPDColorectal cancer remains the 3rd most common cancer and is the 2nd leading cause of cancer-related deaths in the United States.

The causes of colon cancer are multi-factorial. They include cellular, molecular, and genetic factors, as well as dietary and lifestyle factors. Today, I’m going to focus on one significant yet modifiable risk factor, obesity.

We start with a glimpse at the numbers.

The incidence rate of obesity is alarmingly high among U.S. adults based on CDC data. Rates for different age groups include middle-aged (40.2%), older (37.0%), and younger (32.3%). Also, about 17% of children and adolescents (age 2-19) are obese.

More than 29 million adults and children in the U.S. have diabetes. 86 million Americans have pre-diabetes, a condition that can lead to type-2 diabetes. Note that an estimated one in two seniors has pre-diabetes.

Obesity may be a factor in approximately 300,000 deaths each year. Diabetes will cause an estimated 75,578 deaths and colorectal cancer, an expected 49,190 deaths in 2016.

A look beyond the numbers

Obesity is a leading cause of diabetes, a disease for which the body fails to control blood sugar levels. High blood sugar levels are characteristic of both obesity and diabetes. What is less well known is that diabetes and obesity are also linked to an increase in cancer risk.

In fact, obesity is linked to many types of cancer (colon, esophageal, thyroid, breast, prostate, uterine, kidney, pancreas, gallbladder and non-Hodgkins lymphoma) and, needless to say, heart disease, stroke, and other chronic illnesses.

Research shows that obesity and diabetes are associated with an increased risk of developing colon cancer.

Intrinsic links between obesity, diabetes, and colon cancer are vastly complicated. One clear tie is sugar. High levels of blood sugar are a characteristic in both obesity and diabetes. High blood sugar also makes us predisposed to cancer by increasing the activity of a gene involved in cancer progression. Apparently, dietary sugar is a link tying together obesity, diabetes, and colon cancer, and thus excess sugar has an impact on our risk for cancer.

Certainly, other links play a causal role. For instance, chronic inflammation is a central process that likely leads obese individuals to an elevated risk of diabetes and colon cancer, which all three conditions share a common inflammatory loop participated by multiple cell signaling molecules, growth and nuclear factors.

Highlighted Call for Actions

1. Colon Cancer screening

If you or your loved ones turn 50, you all should begin screening for colorectal cancer and then continue getting screened at regular intervals. This is because colorectal cancer almost always develops from precancerous polyps (abnormal growths) in the colon or rectum. Colorectal polyps can be found by screening and then removed before they develop into cancers. Plus, any developing cancer can be found earlier by screening when treatment works best.

2. Diabetes Control

Early intervention is critical to preventing or delaying the onset of type-2 diabetes. Good news for our nation’s seniors is that Medicare will extend coverage for pre-diabetes care. Check out the National Diabetes Prevention Program, a preventive health initiative via the Center for Medicare & Medicaid Innovation.

3. Healthy Weight Management

Nutrition and balance diet, weight loss, daily physical activity and healthy lifestyle are all beneficial for keeping weight down. Look for further details in CancerPreventionDaily earlier posts.

In brief, obese people are at a higher risk for developing cancer. Also, an obese condition is often resistant to chemotherapy regimens. The bottom line is that obesity prevention is a key life-saving approach.

 

Image source: CancerPreventionDaily

Inspired by World Cancer Day

By Hui Xie-Zukauskas

WCD_WeCan n ICanWorld Cancer Day (February 4th, each year) is a global observance and initiative to fight cancer. The theme of 2016 World Cancer Day is “We can” and “I can”, being selected by the Union for International Cancer Control (UICC).

We can and I can – clarity, simplicity and forcefulness.

Much focus of World Cancer Day goes towards raising awareness of cancer, reducing risks of cancer, and learning how to prevent, detect and treat cancer early. To help achieve this goal, I’d like to bring one thing to the spotlight: Lifestyle modification.

Why? Only 5–10% of all cancer cases are attributed to genetic or inherited mutation. 35- 40% of cancer can be prevented by a major lifestyle change.

Next, how can you modify lifestyle to a healthier, livelier one? I’ve given a lot of information and strategies through CancerPreventionDaily.com. Here are 7 quick and effective tips:

1.      Quit smoking, period. This is not only for the individual but also for your loved ones and many, many others.

2.      Avoid or limit alcohol. Have we seen enough how alcohol takes a toll at physical, mental, emotional and social levels?

3.      Get physically active! Walk, run, jump, play or gardening … do whatever you can at where you are to move each day.

4.      Eat smart. Diet is intimately linked to diseases, as English Proverb cautions, “Don’t dig your grave with your own knife and fork”. In developing cancer, processed meats and foods speed it up, while a plenty of fresh vegetables and fruits slow it down.

5.      Maintain a healthy weight. It is well-accepted that obesity is a significant risk factor of several types of cancer. Taking the above actions will benefit weight loss.

6.      Avoid over-exposure to sun.

7.      Remember early detection.

Cancer is preventable disease. With hope and love, we all can do our own part and contribute to prevention or cure of cancer, ultimately making a difference in saving lives.

 

Image credit: worldcancerday.org

10 Things Important to Know about Lead Poisoning

By Hui Xie-Zukauskas

Lead Q & Tap Water_CPDWhat are your thoughts on the Flint lead-poisoning water crisis? Are you concerned about the quality of your drinking water? Do you know how lead may impact your body in the long-term? Read on, you’ll get an instant and clear idea.

Exposure to lead is a serious public health problem because of its association with numerous damages to nearly every system in the human body and various cancers. Here are 10 key concerns and strategies you need to know:

1. A hidden fact: Lead contamination is colorless, odorless, tasteless, and likely symptomless. So, it often goes unknown.

2. Routes of lead toxicity: Lead can get into your body through the water you drink, the food you eat and the air you breathe. How can lead get into your water? Your municipal water system or your house may have pipes containing lead or joined with lead solder.

3. The critical numbers: For lead awareness, I suggest to focus on these two: First, tap water lead should be below the EPA’s action level of 15 parts per billion (ppb) or 15 mg/L.Second, in children (esp. under age 5), a blood lead level of 5 micrograms per deciliter (5 mg/dl) or higher should raise a red flag, as the reference level of CDC recommended public health initiatives. If their blood lead levels exceed 10 mg/dl, the children can be in serious trouble!

4. The irreversible health consequences: Lead is a common occupational and environmental toxin with well-known adverse effects on intelligence, school achievement and behavior. Lead exposure also increases a risk for a variety of chronic illnesses such as hypertension, heart disease and kidney disease.

5. The Link to cancer: Lead is one of the heavy metals that are classified as a probable human carcinogen, according to the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC). Lead has been linked to cancers of lung, stomach, breast, and renal cells, although further studies await.

6. The influence on generations: Lead compounds cause genetic impairment through various mechanisms including interfering with DNA synthesis and repair, interaction with DNA-binding proteins and tumor-fighting proteins, so genotoxicity can potentially pass on to generations.

7. Drinking and cooking water safety – 3 Rules:

  • Rule 1: Never use warm or hot tap water for drinking, cooking or mixing baby formula.
  • Rule 2: Flush the cold water system for 1-2 minutes especially when the faucet has not been used for several hours. (Otherwise, use the water that’s flushed out for other purposes.)
  • Rule 3: Most desirable is to filter tap water for drinking and cooking. It also costs less than buying bottled water.

8. Children and lead beyond water: Infants and children are susceptible to lead toxicity. So, test your children’s blood lead level.

In fact, the biggest source of lead poisoning in children today is dust and chips from deteriorating lead paint on interior surface or toys. Also be aware that Pica behavior (esp. the ingestion of lead-containing foreign bodies) is a well-established risk factor of lead intoxication in children that may cause grave consequences. Lead is such a ubiquitous environmental toxin widely distributed around the world (e.g. the soil in your kids’ playground) that as a surprise, some traditional herbs (e.g. Ayurveda) may contain toxic amounts of lead.

9. Enough calcium intake: Lead mainly interrupts calcium-dependent processes and calcium signaling in the cells. So ensure enough consumption of calcium and antioxidants from fresh veggies or fruits helps combat negative effects of lead.

10. Everybody has responsibility to prevent water polluting. Learning from the Flint water disaster, we all need to keep vigilant at protecting clean water sources. If you suspect any change in the water, immediately contact your local public health or water system authority.

Bonus ending: Bottled water can serve as an alternative, as the FDA sets specific regulations for it. Take a cautious measure, because not all bottled water is created equal, and bottled water may contain 40% or more of tap water.

 

Image credit: oxfordcounty.ca & CPD

Two Key Sources of Lung Cancer Development

By Hui Xie-Zukauskas

Lung Cancer_lungcancer.about.com_iStock_000016025129_LargeWhen I think about lung cancer, I replay horrifying memories of my dad being cruelly taken away by lung cancer within two months after diagnosis, and my mother-in-law being painfully tortured for two years after her lung surgery. And they both were non-smokers.

Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer-related deaths worldwide; you may have a story to tell, too. Let’s give lung cancer awareness a boost this month. Aside from genetic factors and pre-existing lung diseases, I’m going to talk about two important factors.

I.                   Tobacco and environmental carcinogenic factors

Much has been done by quit smoking campaigns. Yet stores still sell and folks still buy and smoke cigarettes. Let’s make this message clear:

Smoking Destroys Your Main Weapon to Fight Cancer!

Why? Tobacco smoking causes a profound mutation of genes, especially mutation of a tumor suppressor (called p53), the protein that helps you fight cancer! Research reveals elephants (Asian and Africa) have 20 copies of the tumor suppressor gene TP53, while humans have only one copy, which may explain why the cancer rate is significantly lower in elephants than in humans. Why would anyone destroy this powerful anti-cancer weapon? And remember: Exposure to second-hand smoke can also lead to dire consequences.

Because most lung cancers result from inhaling cancer-causing substances, it’s also critical to stay away from environmental hazards that are risk factors for lung cancer. These include:

  • radon
  • asbestos
  • air pollution
  • exposure to certain occupational materials (coal, tar, arsenic, nickel, chromium and cement dust)
  • radiation
  • toxic household cleaners

There are also many microorganisms (viruses, bacteria and parasites) in our environment that are carcinogens.

II.                Dietary or food mutagens and carcinogens

Food quality and sources are of major concern, because you may have no idea what’s hidden inside. Let me highlight three common factors that can potentially cause lung and other cancers:

1.  Improper cooking

Meat (beef, pork, fish, or poultry) cooked at high temperatures generates potential cancer-causing compounds, such as heterocyclic amines (HCAs) and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). In many studies, rodents fed a diet containing HCAs developed lung cancer and cancers of the breast, colon, liver, skin, and prostate. PAHs were shown to promote cancers of lung and gastrointestinal tract as well as leukemia. Analysis of human urinary samples confirmed mutagenic exposure to high-heat cooked meat.

2.  Processed foods

The World Health Organization recently classified processed meats as carcinogens. Food additives and/or coloring substances such as nitrite and nitrate are so-called mutagens. They trigger mutation, and accumulated mutations may progress to cancer.

3.  “Junk foods”

Other dietary factors include over-intake of sugar, fat, sodium, and total calories. Those factors lead to fat buildup, obesity, and potentially genetic alteration that promotes cancer.

Putting it all together, a modern lifestyle of convenience is often mixed with outdoor air pollution by environmental toxins and indoor air pollution by tobacco smoke and volatile organic compounds, along with food contamination by food additives and carcinogenic agents.

Quite disturbing and concerning, isn’t it? So, let’s raise awareness to a higher level this month, this year, and beyond!

Ladies, especially watch out – because women are at higher risk of developing lung cancer than men, whether you smoke or not!

 

Image credit: lungcancer.about.com and istockphoto.com

Eight Aspects of Childhood Cancer’s Unique Challenges

By Hui Xie-Zukauskas

Kids in red_bedes.orgChildren are our treasure, and children’s health is our nation’s wealth. Don’t you agree? Today, I briefly summarize why childhood cancers create unique challenges for us, for kids and their families, despite great progresses in the development of innovative or healing therapies. Here are 8 aspects of the “why”:

  1. The common cancers that develop in children and adolescents differ from those that occur in adults. The most common types of childhood cancer are leukemia, brain tumors and lymphoma, whereas cancers of lung, colon, skin, breast and prostate strike most American adults.
  2. Cancers in children and adolescents vary among ages. So, each age group needs its own target treatment and care.
  3. Young kids are still in their developmental stages and vulnerable to cancer treatments. For instance, treatment like radiation can harm their organs and tissues.
  4. Each childhood cancer needs its own set of treatments – although some cancers that seem different can be treated similarly. One-size-fits-all is not an effective approach.
  5. Lifestyle-related risk factors (e.g. smoking, alcohol, physical inactivity) play seemingly little role in childhood cancers, unlike many cancers of adults. Very few environmental factors, such as radiation exposure, have been linked with childhood cancer risk, although it might be unavoidable due to cancer treatment need.
  6. Prevention is challenging too. Pediatric cancers are generally caused by some key genetic mutations or changes. But it doesn’t mean that we can’t do anything about it.
  7. Childhood cancers are rare, complex and aggressive in nature and in a small population; thereby posing challenges to research and development of new therapies.
  8. Survivors of childhood cancers face a life-long risk of developing another cancer. First, the treatments themselves have the potential to cause cancer. Second, young survivors also have to live with health problems (so-called late effect from cancer treatment) for the rest of their entire life. Sometimes the late effect can seriously affect body and mind.

While we’re embracing the heartbreak of childhood cancers, we should also care about the quality of life for young cancer patients and their families. One important thing in fighting childhood cancers is to cultivate in your children a healthy lifestyle at an early age, so that you can lower your children’s risk of getting cancer later in life.

So, knowing the unique challenges of childhood cancers, what will you do to be a part of a fighting force? Remember: a little effort adds up! It can be as little as spreading the word!

 

Image credit: bedes.org

Keys to Being Mobile Friendly While Staying Protected Wisely

By Hui Xie-Zukauskas

Smartphone_radiation_medicalpracticeinsider.comLet’s talk today about a hotly debated issue related to our daily lives.

Mobile technology has not only grown popular, it’s become a necessity. Mobile phone uses expand far beyond keeping connections with families and friends and conducting business. Today, you can enjoy conveniences ranging from information about thousands of topics, entertainment, self-learning, to mobile banking, mobile wallet, and innovative healthcare.

But “smartphones,” as convenient and useful as they are, also invite some serious consequences, including a cancer risk from radiation, especially for brain tumor, and other health hazards (e.g., male infertility, neurological disorders, and metabolic and sleep troubles). The most immediate life-threatening danger is from traffic accidents that may occur while someone’s messaging or conversing on the phone. Lighter problems may include pains in the fingers, tendons, neck, or back that otherwise are without a clear explanation.

In light of these problems, how do you get mobile friendly while maintaining wellness wisely?

Here are some thought-provoking questions to evaluate your long-term health and protect your valuable treasure – your health:

  • Is there another way available to obtain your desired results with little or no radiation? If so, take the alternative way.
  • Is a poor signal a warning against radiation damage or a “must” to keep microwaving the brain?
  • Before purchasing a new cell phone, ask or search for answers to the question – Does this device emit the most intensive radiation? Make sure your tech source is reliable.
  • On the road, could the conversation you are in potentially destroy you? Hint: using “hand-free” headsets are not accident-proof!
  • Are privacy and data safety of concern to you? If so, get rid of this stressor.
  • Gentlemen, do you keep your cell phones away from your pants whenever possible?
  • Are you aware of your posture when you are focused on your mobile devices? A poor posture is a red flag for various health issues.
  • Are you conscious about “passive radiation” that may affect others, especially in a crowed public setting? Remember, non-ionizing radiation from cell phones goes not only to human brain but also to the air!
  • Do you disposal of your cell phones in an eco-friendly way?

Last but not the least – Three pointers for protecting your kids

  1. Intentionally postpone early childhood exposure and tactically limit your children’s mobile use, because they face a longer lifetime exposure to any hidden health hazards.
  2. Clean your children’s cell phones often, and train them to practice this habit daily, because a cell phone is a safe haven for many bacteria, including antibiotic-resistant “superbug(s).”
  3. A rule of thumb:  Say NO to going mobile during bedtime. Be their angel and protector!

Note: The blog “Cell Phone Use and Cancer Risk Concerns” at http://www.cancerpreventiondaily.com/cell-phone-use-and-cancer-risk-concerns/ explains why children are more vulnerable to the carcinogenic effects generated from cell phone.

Image credit: medicalpracticeinsider.com

How do you integrate vascular health and cancer prevention?

PAD_leg artery_by CDCBy Hui Xie-Zukauskas

For those who may be unaware of what cancer and heart disease share in common, today I wish to remind you of why I talk about cardiovascular diseases. When I started this website, with its focus on cancer prevention, I had a well thought-out approach to maximize your benefits for heart health as well. To put it simply, there are many practices that will help you “kill two birds with one stone”—both cancer and heart disease.

So today, let me elaborate on cardiovascular risk factors that a cancer-prevention lifestyle can help allay.

First, let me ask you, Do you know if you have peripheral vascular diseases (PVD) or not? About 20 million of people in the United States are suffering from PVD, yet they don’t even know it. What does that have to do with cancer prevention? Please read on.

What is PVD, and what is PAD?

Almost everyone knows about atherosclerosis. Well, PVD is one of the major clinical complications of atherosclerosis. It affects blood vessels outside of the heart and brain, e.g. those of your body’s extremities.

When PVD only develops in the arteries, it is usually called peripheral arterial disease (PAD), which results in reduced blood flow to the lower extremities. PAD is predominantly caused by the buildup of fatty plaque in small arteries, resulting in the narrowing of those arteries, blocking blood flow from the heart to the legs. Consequently, the hallmark of PAD is extreme pain or painful cramping in the legs.

However, many folks with PAD experience no symptoms. That is why it is important to raise public awareness.

PAD and aging

PAD is neither a men’s nor a women’s disease—it is more of an aging disease. According to the NIH and CDC, one in every 20 Americans over age 50 has PAD, and approximately 12-20% of people older than age 60 have it. By age 80, 20-25% of Americans have PAD.

What are the risk factors for PAD?

So far, we have covered two already:

  •      Atherosclerosis
  •      Aging

Other risk factors include:

  •     Smoking
  •     Diabetes
  •     High blood pressure
  •     High cholesterol or abnormal cholesterol – too much “bad” LDL cholesterol and too little “good” HDL cholesterol
  •     Being overweight or obese
  •     Family history of high cholesterol, high blood pressure, or cardiovascular disease (stroke, coronary artery disease, or PVD).
  •     Stress

What does learning about PAD have to do with cancer prevention?

The table below shows the risk factors that cancer and PAD have in common.

Risk Factors

Cancer

PAD

 Aging

 Tobacco use / Smoking

 Obesity

 Being physically inactive

 Inflammation

indirectly, because it’s linked to atherosclerosis

 Stress

 Diabetes

 Junk diet (high fats, high sugar, excessive salt)

may lead to other risk factors above

 Hormonal imbalance

Without distracting from today’s focus, I have addressed each of risk factors in previous CancerPreventionDaily Summer Health Education Series, and you can learn more by visiting CancerPreventionDaily.com

What’s the take-away message?

  1. PAD is under-diagnosed and lacking in public awareness, yet its incidence increases with age disturbingly.
  2. Make a cancer-prevention lifestyle your priority. Lifestyle modification is one of the keys to controlling and preventing PAD as well as cancer.
  3. Take action using the “Five Seconds Rule”—meaning that whether you consult with your physician or change one unhealthy lifestyle habit, take one small step at a time and do it now!

 

Image credit: CDC